not all those who wander are lost....
What is courage?

Imām al-Hasan [a] was once asked about courage, to which he replied:

It is to know when to stand up to ones opponents, and when to be patient in the face of criticism and slander.’

(Bihār al-Anwār, v. 78, p. 104, no. 2)
It is the worst kind of trade, whereby one considers the world worthy of his self; and purchases the world at the expense of the Hereafter.

Imam Ali (a.s.)

Source: Nahjul Balagha, sermon 32

mid-night-poetry:

Patience raises its hands in awe of Abbas

Forty percent of Muslims say they have a college degree or more, compared to the 29 percent of Americans overall. Muslim women in America… are statistically likely as Muslim men to hold college or postgraduate degrees. Muslim women also report monthly household incomes more or nearly equal to men’s, compared to women and men in other faith groups.
Dr. John Esposito, The Future of Islam (via thelittlephilosopher)

Remember, that this world which you covet so ardently and attempt to acquire so earnestly, and which some times annoys you and some times pleases you so much, is neither your home nor a permanent destination. You have not been created for it, nor invited to it as your resting place. It shall neither remain with you forever nor will you remain in it eternally.

“If it has enticed you with its charms, it has also warned and cautioned you of real dangers lurking in its folds. Take account of the warnings it has given you and do not be seduced or deceived by its allurements. These warnings should desist you from being too greedy or too covetous to possess it. Try, to advance towards the place where you are invited for eternal bliss, and turn your face away from the vicious world.

Imam Ali (a.s.)

Source: Nahjul Balagha, Sermon 173

allthingspakistanicelebs:

One of my favorite instagramers: karachichaiwalla

Whoever he is, he takes beautiful photos of everyday life in Karachi. The chai photos make me nostalgic and take me back to a place I left long ago.. I can smell the chai and hear the pour through his photos. You should follow him.

themuslimavenger:

“She was born with a gift of laughter and a sense that the world was mad.”
Mongolian girl laughing in front of her house

themuslimavenger:

“She was born with a gift of laughter
and a sense that the world was mad.”

Mongolian girl laughing in front of her house

themuslimavenger:

Humble Architecture
"A heavy iron chain hangs in the upper part of the court entrance on the western side of the Mosque. Only the sultan was allowed to enter the court of the Blue Mosque on horseback. The chain was put there, so that the sultan had to lower his head every time he enter the court in order not to get hit.
It was done as a symbolic gesture, to ensure the humility of the ruler in the face of the divine.”
Blue Mosque

themuslimavenger:

Humble Architecture

"A heavy iron chain hangs in the upper part of the court entrance on the western side of the Mosque. Only the sultan was allowed to enter the court of the Blue Mosque on horseback. The chain was put there, so that the sultan had to lower his head every time he enter the court in order not to get hit.

It was done as a symbolic gesture, to ensure the humility of the ruler in the face of the divine.

Blue Mosque

And men go abroad to admire the heights of mountains, the mighty waves of the sea, the broad tides of rivers, the compass of the ocean, and the circuits of the stars, yet pass over the mystery of themselves without a thought.
St. Augustine of Hippo, The Confessions  (via thelittlephilosopher)
As a result of this pattern of public condemnation followed by inaction, the targeted groups, particularly the Shi’a of the Punjabi and Hazara communities, seem to have concluded that the state is unwilling or unable to protect them from militants. Indeed, many believe that state authorities must be complicit in these incidents because they frequently take place in crowded, public places during daytime hours, seemingly too daring if there were not assurances of impunity. In the words of one local Hazara leader, the police in Quetta keep staging the same drama again and again. First, they afford safe passage to the real murderers while arresting innocent people in a public display of purportedly acting against the terrorists. Next they release those who were arrested on the grounds that there is no solid evidence linking them to the attack. The complacency shown by police officials in the face of sectarian killings lends credence to such claims. For instance, Usman Saifullah Kurd, a notorious sectarian militant believed to be the mastermind of the massive attack on Imam Bargah Kalan, managed to escape from the maximum security Anti-Terrorist Force (ATF) Prison in Quetta along with his two accomplices in 2006. Although an inquiry was initiated after the escape, the results, if any, have not been made public. That the attackers remain at large while no high-ranking police official has been held accountable for the apparent negligence leading to the escape is an oft-cited example of the complacency that generates conspiracy theories of official complicity in these attacks.
Stephen Dedalus, The Bitter Harvest Sectarianism in Balochistan  (via khatmal)